5 Reasons to Recruit during The Holidays

Soon, Thanksgiving will be upon us. For most companies, this heralds the season where management, production and hiring starts to gear down to a less hectic pace. Recruiting at this time is virtually at a standstill. But, believe it or not, the Holiday Season and the end of the year can and should be one of your most productive times to find talent. Here are 5 reasons why December is one of the best months to recruit: 1. Availability Candidates are more available this time of year. With Holiday parties, time off and relaxed management, candidates will have an easier time taking calls, scheduling interviews and changing jobs. They may have unused vacation they need to take, giving them extra time for the job search. Hiring managers are also more available this time of year. For the same reasons candidates have extra time, so do our hiring managers. Managers will be dealing with less meetings, conferences and business travel. This is the best month to catch a hiring manager in their office and find them open to a conversation. 2. Higher Visibility Recruiters, pay attention. December is the best month to get your jobs seen on the web. Traffic, clutter and competitor postings will be way down. Likewise, prospects will be highly active on social media. It’s the perfect confluence of activity for recruiting. Get your jobs posted for high visibility. 3. It’s Budget Time Budgets are being finalized for the new year. Many businesses start their year on January 1st. Hiring managers will know their upcoming budget and their headcount for the coming year. They will also have...

How “old school” are your hiring practices?

The fact is, hiring in the modern age is far more complex than what it once was, so if you’re still following “old school” hiring practices, you definitely need to retire some of those outdated plans. Check out these questions that can help you determine if you need to overhaul your hiring and onboarding plans to pull them into the 21st century. Do you rely solely on the interview process? The common selection process involves pulling applicant resumes and calling in the best for an interview. The interview has long been thought of as the most useful way to determine a candidate’s qualification for a position, but if this is all you’re doing in your hiring process, you need to make some changes. The basic interview falls short for many reasons, and usually aren’t an adequate way to get a true evaluation of an individual. The interview itself should only be one facet of your hiring plans, not the whole plan. A few other things to keep in mind about interviews include: This meeting is just as much an interview of you and your company as it is an interview of a prospect, so allow time for the individual to ask you questions as well. In this tight market, if you’re not selling your company, you’re not doing the whole job. Limiting time ranges for an interview is a sure-fire way to skim over a truly valuable candidate. Give these meetings the proper time allocation. Better yet, feel free to schedule more time out of the office for further discussion. Do your research in advance of an interview so...

7 hiring mistakes even successful business leaders make

Even experienced leaders make hiring mistakes when looking for new talent. The digital world of hiring is a vibrant one full of constant change, and even the most established business leaders sometimes have trouble keeping up. Even the most established hiring professionals can still make mistakes because they are too set in their ways. Here are 7 hiring mistakes to avoid at all costs: 1. Overlooking Internal Talent Your homegrown talent already knows the ropes and company culture. If you can find someone worthy to promote from within, you will save a great deal of money and time in training after the hire. You also give your current staff the ability to expand and challenge themselves, which is a very important feature to attract top talent in the first place. 2. Trusting Guts Over Hard Data Today’s digital environment has given hiring managers access to more data than ever before about prospective employees. There is no longer a need to rely on any “gut feeling” when the answer to just about any question on an employee can be quantified. Hiring managers may employ many techniques, from simple spreadsheets to more sophisticated HR tools and assessments. 3. Shifting Roles Unexpectedly As a company changes and expands, roles within that company must change and expand as well. Hiring managers must first determine whether shifting an employee’s role or completely redefining a position for new talent is the preferable solution. Although shifting an employee’s role may be less expensive, is that employee properly trained and capable to do the new job? Does the new position entail duties that are too expansive for a...

Workers Reveal Plans to Land New Jobs in 2017, According to Careerbuilder Survey

According to a new CareerBuilder survey, more than one in five workers (22 percent) are planning to change jobs in 2017, similar to last year (21 percent). Among younger workers, the numbers are even higher. More than a third of workers ages 18 to 34 (35 percent) expect to change jobs in 2017, compared to 30 percent last year. This compares to 15 percent of workers ages 35 and older. The national survey — conducted online by Harris Poll on behalf of CareerBuilder from November 16 to December 6, 2016, and included a representative sample of 3,411 workers across industries — found 35 percent of workers are regularly searching for new job opportunities, even though they’re currently employed — a one-point increase since last year (34 percent). “Whether it’s unemployed people trying to find their way back to the workforce or those who are currently employed attempting an upgrade to greener pastures, a new year makes many people set their sights on job hunting,” said Rosemary Haefner, chief human resources officer for CareerBuilder. “To keep your top workers, you need to keep a pulse on what they’re seeking. For example, poll your employees from time to time to learn more about their goals and motivations and how they want to be treated.” When asked what extra perks would make them more willing to join or stay with a company, the most popular choices workers pointed to include: Half-day Fridays: 40 percent; On-site fitness center: 27 percent; Being able to wear jeans: 23 percent; Daily catered lunches: 22 percent; and My own office: 22 percent. Source: CareerBuilder. Reposted with permission...

Master the Art of Hiring in 8 Steps

You and leaders of your hiring team have worked hard to develop, improve, and refine the talent acquisition process, yet bad hires continue to plague your company and its growth. Sound familiar? You’re not alone. Per recent data, two thirds of U.S. employers reported that bad hires negatively impacted business. Few missteps hurt an organization more than a poor hiring decision. The collateral damage caused by a bad hire extends far beyond frustration to include lost productivity, low employee morale, and exorbitant recruiting costs. With your company’s bottom line and organizational culture at stake, you simply can’t afford to make a bad hire. It’s time to be proactive. Outlined below are eight steps designed to help your organization adopt a more strategic and effective hiring process. If executed consistently, this approach will yield increased retention, greater output, and financial gains. Additionally, because this topic resonates with so many of our Members, on November 17th I will be facilitating a free webinar, 7 Mistakes that Lead to a Bad Hire, centered on effective hiring practices, and you are invited and encouraged to attend. 1. Define the specs When it comes to the hiring process, haste makes waste. Too often, companies rush to post a job, whether it be a matter of urgency or convenience, in hopes of filling the position quickly. However, the hiring process should not be treated as a swift transaction. Instead, it’s critical that you approach it in a holistic manner. First it is necessary to develop a time line, identify specifically what the open role will entail, what the key requirements will be, what type of...

Two Weapons to Avoid a Bad Hire and Vanquish the Money-Eating Monster Forever – Part 2

In the first installment of Vanquishing the Money-Eating Monster, we looked at the costs of a bad hire and your first line of defense—a carefully executed recruitment strategy. Today we’ll consider your second powerful weapon to avoid this pervasive problem… Weapon #2: Data! Over the years, I’ve often heard people talk about “going with their gut” to arrive at a final candidate for a job. But when it comes to hiring the right person, the only thing you should count on your gut to tell you is when it’s time for lunch. Otherwise, there’s a good chance you’ll end up with someone you really like who’s just all wrong for the job. Using objective data from a low-effort assessment tool can turn a subjective and inefficient hiring process into a more accurate and productive one.  Plus, incorporating assessments into your recruitment procedures can save you time and energy, especially if you regularly have lots of positions to fill and resumes to wade through. At MEA, the Predictive Index (PI) is our data-generating weapon of choice. Here’s how we wield Weapon #2 in the hiring process: Dig deeper into the job. First we run an analysis of the job to identify the behaviors and hard-wired traits that will make a person successful in the role. These traits get incorporated into the job description, which is now more effective in recruiting the right people. Understand each candidate’s underlying attributes and motivators. We evaluate each candidate to find out what innate characteristics and instinctive behaviors they exhibit, and use that information to develop what we call a predictive index, or PI. Objectively...

Two Weapons to Avoid a Bad Hire and Vanquish the Money-Eating Monster Forever – Part 1

Your Quality Assurance Manager just quit, and your company’s Peg Legs need to be on shelves in time for International Talk Like a Pirate Day in two months! Quick! Dust off the old job description, post the opening, pull together an interview team! And get your next fabulous employee in that chair ASAP! But, wait! Have you ever considered how much putting the wrong person in that empty chair could cost you? Quite a lot, according the U.S. Department of Labor. Take the annual salary for that potential mistake. Multiply it by 30% (or more, say some). And there you have it folks—the expense of a bad hire (not to mention the effects on your team’s morale). How does that price tag for purchasing a revolving empty seat sound? Years of experience have taught me that the money-eating monster I call Bad Hire has two parents: A poorly executed recruitment process and our own flawed human nature. But I’ve got two weapons to help you defeat them! Read on, brave HR warrior! Weapon #1: A carefully executed hiring process (like this one)… Evaluate the job at hand. Really. Don’t just resurrect an old job description! Take the time to really consider the skills, behaviors, and personality traits a person will need to be successful in the job as it stands today. And make sure your hiring team is on the same page! Get the job description right. Describe the job’s activities in detail. Clearly outline what a potential employee needs to be and do if they’re going to succeed in this role. Be sure to use words that will...

How to Hire Someone When it’s Really Not Your Forte: Holly’s Top 3 Recruitment Strategies

The other day over a couple of Keurig specials, I was catching up with my friend Chris. Chris’s official title at his small but growing employer is CFO. But a couple times a year, his title morphs into “temporary HR specialist extraordinaire.” Chris looked pretty harried. I figured one of those HR duties must have landed on his desk recently. So I asked him what’s up. It turns out Chris’s company needed to add a Project Engineer to the team for a new rollout. And it was Chris’s job to find the right candidate. How’s it going? I asked, pretending not to see the obvious. Horribly it turns out, as I suspected. The job market is tightening. Lots of companies are recruiting hard and heavy. And talented people are getting trickier to find. To make things worse, Chris’s first strategy was a loser: He posted the job opening on Monster, CareerBuilder, and Dice. You probably know how the rest of the story goes. It’s probably happened to you, too. Chris got LOTS of responses. Lots and lots of UNDER-QUALIFIED, often automated responses. And on the rare occasion he decided one of them might be worth contacting, they rarely responded. Fortunately, Holly, my hiring guru here at MEA, has the best handle on recruiting this side of the Atlantic. So to save Chris from further heartburn, I gave him “Holly’s Top Three Recruitment Tactics.” I’m sharing them here in case they can save you from the Dicey Monster Mountain of Career-Building Resumes. Holly’s Top 3 Recruitment Tactics 1. Incentivize your staff to find their newest best colleague. Your employees are...

You Have Found the Needle in the Haystack; Now What?

Each and every hire in small to mid-sized business is enormously important to business success. Thus, you’ve invested significant resources searching for the right person, and congratulations – you’ve found them!  It’s a great feeling to have successfully hired someone who you believe to be a potential high performer.  And you should feel good because hiring right in today’s economy is hard.  But it’s not time to relax just yet. You put so much time into hiring that person you want him or her to start working now, right? Wrong. Employee on-boarding is a pivotal component of talent acquisition that often goes under-emphasized. On-boarding is an important aspect of setting the stage for employee success. And by employee on-boarding I am not referring to the first few hours of a new hire’s day where he or she fills out the necessary paperwork.  Some organizations proudly define their new employee orientation as “a day with the HR administrator” where they review the handbook, get an employee signature for the file, address housekeeping issues, and sufficiently bore the heck out of their new hire. I’m not saying it isn’t necessary or important, but calling paperwork on-boarding is just awfully limiting.  Truly effective on-boarding needs to be so much more than just a day; it needs to be a process – a process that serves to properly engage a new hire and position him or her for future success through goal setting, coaching and mentoring. GOAL SETTING In order to create an environment where employees are objectively managed to outcomes, goal setting is a necessary objective.  Goal setting should be done once...

So you’ve lost or fired an employee…

…and now you have to find a replacement.  It’s easy to start calculating their salary and benefits cost, but have you thought about all the other costs? Costs during the recruiting process: Costs and time involved with writing the description and posting Time reviewing applicants and cost of tracking system Time on phone screening, scheduling, prepping for interviews, executing interviews Time re-interviewing, scheduling, checking references, and testing And this doesn’t even factor in lost productivity, loss of customers, loss of brand equity, training costs, etc.  Some estimates range from 30-50% of the annual salary for entry-level employees, 150% for middle level employees, and up to 400% for specialized, high level employees!  With numbers like these, it’s easy to see why increasing the quality of your hiring can be a great financial performance booster for your...

Effective Recruiting Strategies in Today’s Market

“The old adage ‘people are your most important asset’ is wrong.  People are not your most important asset.  The right people are.”    -Jim Collins, Good to Great Do you know what it costs your organization to replace one employee?  Direct and indirect costs, such as lost productivity, loss of customers, loss of brand equity, recruiting costs, training costs, etc., can add up quickly.  Estimates range from 30-50% of the annual salary for entry-level employees, 150% for middle level employees, and up to 400% for specialized, high level employees!  With numbers like these, it’s easy to see why increasing the quality of your hiring can be a great financial performance booster for your organization. Attendees at MEA’s recent briefing on Effective Recruiting Strategies in Today’s Market are all feeling the effects of the talent war, and need techniques to attract and retain the best employees for their organizations. Co-facilitator Kathy Jones of CBI Group emphasized the need for proactive vs. reactive recruiting: Using Boolean strings on search engine sites to identify potential candidates Searching job board resume databases using keywords related to the position requirements Networking and utilizing referrals with individuals to uncover candidates, including the use of social media networking sites Cold calling into companies E-mail campaigns Career fairs (Virtual and Live) and Networking Events College Recruiting Internal Recruiting (Succession Plans) In addition to employing on-going recruiting efforts, co-facilitator Kathy Muscarella of MEA addressed the critical role of hiring best practices: a)      Employment Applications – Have a policy in place as well as consistent practices regarding Equal Employment opportunities; require a signed acknowledgement of “employment at-will” status for...